Population - Class 9 Geography, CBSE Guide NCERT Questions Bank

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Class IX Geography (CONTEMPORARY INDIA - I)
Chapter 6, POPULATION

Answers of the some very short and short answer type Question Nos 1 - 14 already  posted in our earlier post:


Short Answer-Type Questions 
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(Source: Google)

Question 15. What is 'Child-Labour'? Why is child labour banned? Write two reasons.
AnswerWhen children below the age of 14 are employed in factories or business establishments, it is called child labour.
Article 39 (f) of our Constitution lays down that state shall ensure that the children are given opportunities and facilities to develop in a healthy manner and in conditions of freedom and dignity and the children are protected against exploitation and against moral and material abandonment.
Acting on these guidelines, our Government has  banned child labour. It has been banned because of the following reasons:
(1) Child labour has been banned to save children from exploration and moral and material abandonment.
(2) Child labour has been banned to enable children to receive proper education and to develop into healthy citizens later on in their lives and lead a life of freedom and dignity.

Question 16. West Bengal is more densely populated than Punjab. Give reasons.
AnswerWest Bengal is more densely populated than Punjab.  According to 2011 Census, while, in Punjab, the density of population is 550 persons per Sq.km. that of West Bengal is 1028 persons per Sq.km. The reasons for the same are the following:
(1) While in Punjab the growth rate has been declining after 1981, in Bengal however, it has increased, thus, adding to the density of population in case of Bengal.
(2) There is more migration of people from Punjab to other countries as compared to Bengal.
(3) The continuous illegal entry of Bangladeshi citizens into West Bengal added in a great way to the density of population in Bengal while there is very little entry of people from Pakistan into Punjab. 

Question 17. Kerala state is densely populated. Give two reasons.
AnswerAs per 2011 Census, the population density of Kerala is 860 persons per sq.km. Some of the reasons for the high population density of Kerala are the following:
(1) Kerala state is a part of the West Coastal Plains which are quite levelled and fertile and there is enough of rainfall. As such, there is no scarcity of food in Kerala.
(2) Kerala lies on the sea-shore for a long distance as such she earns both in external and internal trade. 

Question 18. What makes West Bengal the most thickly populated state in India? State three reasons.
AnswerOf all the states of India, West Bengal has the highest density of population with 1028 persons per sq.km (Census 2011) which is higher than the national average 382 persons per sq.km. The reasons are the following:
(1) West Bengal receives a fair amount of rainfall in addition to the river Ganges which provides extensive irrigational facilities.
(2) Apart from being in the Indo Gangetic Plain, the whole region is flat and has very fertile alluvial soils which produce in abundance to eat.
(3) West Bengal is centre of many agro-based and metal-based industries which supports easy livelihood for large population.

Question 19. Why has there been such a sudden abrupt rise in population of India since 1921?
Or
Give reasons for the steep rise in India's population since 1921.
AnswerThe year 1921 represents an important landmark in the population history of India. Before 1921, the population of India was almost stable, though sometimes it fluctuated by rising in a particular year and falling again in another year. But after 1921, the rise in population was abrupt and constant. The year 1921 is, therefore, called 'a great divide' between the two trends of a halting population and constantly increasing population. The chief causes for this abrupt rise in population after 1921 are given as under:
(1) The first cause is the steady fall in the death rate. With the introduction of better health facilities and and so many discoveries in the field of medicine, epidemics like plague were controlled. Such factors brought down the death rate considerably.
(2) Public Health Services were extended to more and more people particularly after independence. The national government extended these services to remote villages to ensure better health facilities which resulted in a low death rate.
(3) New medicines like penicillin and antibiotics reduced the death rate and even fatal diseases like T.B. could be treated effectively.
(4) Particularly, after independence, stress was laid on better living condition both in rural and urban areas. Safe drinking water-supply in cities and towns also controlled many water-borne diseases. 

Question 20. While studying population growth, what are the two main aspects or characteristics to be kept in mind? Explain by distinguishing between the two.
AnswerWhile studying population growth, the following two characteristics are to be kept in mind:
(1) Magnitude of Population Growth, and
(2) Pace of Population Growth.
(1) Magnitude of Population Growth:
Magnitude refers to the number of persons added each year or each decade to a given population. It can be due to three processes of births, deaths and migration.
(2) Pace of Population Growth:
Then the rate of pace with which the population grows or increases per year has a direct impact on population growth. This is recorded in percent per year. If the rate of increase is 3 percent per year it means that three persons are added to every 100 persons in the existing population. If by making effects this pace is reduced to 2 percent per year naturally the growth of population will also decrease accordingly.
Thus, magnitude is the number of people added per year to existing population while pace refers to the speed at which the increase in population takes place. 
Long Answer-Type Questions

Question 21. Write a short note on: Urbanisation in India.
Or
What is the impact of fast -growing cities of India on the environment and available civic amenities?
Or
Write a brief account on the impact of rapid urbanisation in India.
Or
Why has the rapid growth of population in the metropolitan cities of India become a serious problem? Explain any five consequences of the same.

Question 22. Why is it important to study population?
Or
What is the purpose of studying population?

Question 23. What could be the reason of uneven distribution of population in India?
Or
What are the factors which influence the population distribution?
 (To be Continued ... Link for answers of Question No 21 - 23 will be given here soon) 

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CBSE introduces two level maths paper for the first time to reduce exam stress

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In a relief to thousands of students afraid of mathematics, the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) introduces two levels of mathematics evaluation (maths papers) for Class 10 students appearing CBSE Board Examination in 2020 onwards.
The first level math paper or the same as the existing one will be called ‘mathematics-standard’ and the other, which will be easier will be called ‘mathematics-basic’.
According to CBSE circular, this decision has been taken to reduce the maths exam stress for those students who find mathematics difficult.
"It is well known that students experience greatest stress before and during their most difficult subject exam. Keeping in view this important aspect and as evidenced by the Board results, the Board has decided to introduce two levels of examination in Mathematics for the students who are going to appear in the Board examination for the academic session ending March 2020 onwards," the circular said.
Most importantly -
  1. The syllabus, classroom teaching and internal assessment for both levels of math papers would remain the same. All students in a batch will be able to study the whole range of topics covered in the syllabus throughout the year. However, math papers in two levels will not be applicable during internal assessment of students. They will be tested only in standard mathematics during internal evaluation by schools.
  2. The students will be allowed to decide which level they would want to get tested in the Class 9 Board Examination depending upon their aptitude and abilities. They will be tested only in the standard level in Class 9.
  3. Those students who opt for the mathematics-basic level will not be eligible for pursuing mathematics at the plus two level.
  4. CBSE will give a student option to choose between the two level math papers of examination at the end of Class 10 when the schools submit a list of candidates to the board before the board exams. If a student fails to clear his or her opted level then he or she will be allowed to appear in the compartmental examinations in the same level of math what he had selected originally.

Courtesy: www.cbse.nic.in
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NCERT CBSE Guide with extra important Questions Answers - Class IX Geography Chapter 6, Population | CBSE NCERT Solutions

Class 9 Geography - Chapter 6 Population 

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Important Terms & Definitions

Population: Total number of men, women and children living in an area.
Density of Population: Average number of persons per sq. kilometer of total surface area.
Demography: The science that deals with population in various aspects.
Birth Rate: Per thousand live births in a year.
Death Rate:  Death per thousand population in one year.
Natural Growth Rate: The difference between birth rate and the death rate.
Infant Mortality Rate: Number of infants dying under one year of age per thousand births in a year.

Working population: Persons engaged in some useful occupation for earning their living and contributing to a productive economic activity.

(Courtesy: Google)
Very Short Answer-Type Questions

Question 1. Discuss one factor that causes growth of population in India.
Answer: One of the main factors which is responsible for growth of population in India is the widening gap between the birth rate and the death rate.

Question 2. State the population density of India.
AnswerAccording to the latest data, the current growth rate of population in India is 1.11%. The country as a whole has a population density of 412 people per square kilometer, which ranks 31st in the world. As per 2011 census India’s population density increased from 324 in 2001 to 382 per square kilometer, which is considerably higher than the average population density of the world 2011.

Question 3. Which year is considered a great demographic divide in India?
AnswerYear 1921 is considered a great demographic divide in India.

Question 4. Which is the largest state in terms of area in India?
AnswerRajasthan.

Question 5. What is the main cause of rapid population growth in India after 1921?
AnswerLow fall in the birth rate but high fall in the death rate. 

Question 6. What is mostly responsible for sparse population in J&K and Himachal Pradesh?
AnswerRugged terrain and unfavourable climate are the two main reasons for sparse population in J&K and Himachal Pradesh. 

Question 7. Which state of India has the highest density of population?
Answer: According to consensus 2011, Bihar has the highest density of population followed by West Bengal. Population density of Bihar is 1,102/km2  while West Bengal has 1,029/km2

Question 8. Which state of India has the least density of population?
AnswerAccording to consensus 2011, Arunachal Pradesh has the least population density with 17 persons per square km.

Short Answer-Type Questions

Question 9. What is Census?
AnswerCensus is an official numeration of population done after every ten years in India, along with certain social and economic statistics. Census not only helps us in knowing the total number of population but also the latest distribution of population, sex ratio, age composition, occupational structure and literacy of a particular country or state.

Question 10. Define sex ratio.
AnswerBy sex ratio, we mean the number of females per thousand males in the total population. India’s sex ratio has increased over the past 20 years, after dropping for the 80 years before that. According to the Census of 2011, there were 940 Indian women for every 1,000 men, up from 933 in 2001.

Question 11. Discuss the four main causes responsible for the rapid population growth in India.
Or
What are the main causes of the rapid population growth in India?
AnswerThe most important factors responsible for the rapid growth of population in India over the past 50 years are -

(1) Widening Gap between fall in Birth and Death Rates. Low fall in the birth rate in comparison to the high fall in the death rate. In the beginning of the 20th century, the birth rate was 49.2 per thousand which came down to 26.1 per thousand at the end of the century. But during the same period, there has been a huge fall in the death rate from 42.6 per thousand to 8.7 per thousand during the same period.
(2) Religious superstitions, illiteracy and unawareness. A great section of population in India are still illiterate and tradition-ridden as they still believe in child-marriage, multi-marriage system etc. They don't feel to understand the importance of checking the growth of population, the need of family planning.
(3) Poverty, as many poor parents produce children not because they are ignorant but because they need them. This is evident from the fact that there are still around 35 million child workers in India.
(4) Climatic factors as one of the reasons of fast rising population in India is its hot climate.

So, all the above factors resulted in the rapid higher growth rate of population in our country.

Question 12. What is sex ratio? Give two reasons responsible for unfavorable sex ratio in India.
AnswerThe number of women per thousand  men is called sex ratio. India’s sex ratio has increased over the past 20 years, after dropping for the 80 years before that. According to the Census of 2011, there were 940 Indian women for every 1,000 men, up from 933 in 2001.
However, females are still lesser than men per 1000.
The reasons for this unfavorable sex ratio in India are:-
(1) Female children are neglected as compared to male children.
(2) Women are subject to greater risks to their lives especially at the time of child birth.
(3) Early marriages and social evils like dowry-deaths.
(4) Illiteracy among female is high. They have no knowledge about pre-natal and post-natal care.
(5) Low economic and political status of females in India.

Question 13. What is a dependency ratio? How it is calculated? Also mention some signicances of Dependency Ratio. What does the comparison of such ratios between India and Japan reveal us?
Or
What is the meaning of dependency ratio? Why is dependency ratio higher in India? Give two reasons.
Answer
Dependency Ratio & its Calculation: The number of dependent persons per head on working persons is called the dependency ratio. The dependency ratio is calculated by dividing dependent population by the active population and multiplying by 100. So, Dependency Ratio is a measure showing the number of dependents in the age group of 0-14 and over the age of 65 to the total population is referred to as the "total dependency ratio".
Significance of Dependency Ratio: The dependency ratio is important because it shows the ratio of economically inactive compared to economically active. Economically active will pay much more income tax and other taxes. An increase in the dependency ratio can cause fiscal problems for the government.
Dependency Ratio in India & Japan: In India, in 1991, the working population was 55.99% while the dependent population was 44.1%. In this way, the dependency ratio in India in 1991 comes to 78%. This is quite high as compared to Japan whose dependency ratio is 48.8%. It means the proportion of dependant population in India is much higher as compared to Japan.
Reasons for high Dependency Ratio in India: The high dependency ratio in India can be attributed to the following reasons:
(1) Here percentage of children below the age of 15 is quite high. They form 34.33% of the total population.
(2) Here old men, forming 6.97% of the total population, also form a part of the dependency population.
The dependency ratio in India can be reduced by lowering the birth rate over a couple of decades so that not much pressure is put on the economically active population and on our limited resources including health and medical care.

Question 14. What is natural growth rate of population? How can birth rate be brought down? Give two methods for it.
AnswerNatural Growth Rate of Population or Natural Population Increase (in contrast to total population growth) happens as people are born (in contrast to immigration) in a country, and decrease as people die (in contrast to emigrate). Births and deaths are natural causes of population change. The difference between the birth rate and the death rate of a country or place is called the natural growth rate. 


One way to bring down the natural growth rate is by controlling the birth rate. This can be brought down by the following methods:
(1) We must adopt family planning methods to check the birth rate. Two children in one family or rather one child in one family like that of China, should be our ideal.
(2) We must educate our women-folk so that early child-marriage is totally eliminated. Education can prove very useful in bringing down the birth rate.

For answers of the following questions (Nos 15 - 23) see our next post. Link given at the end .. 
Question 15. What is 'Child-Labour'? Why is child labour banned? Write two reasons.

Question 16. West Bengal is more densely populated than Punjab. Give reasons.

Question 17. Kerala state is densely populated. Give two reasons.

Question 18. What makes West Bengal the most thickly populated state in India? State three reasons.

Question 19. Why has there been such a sudden abrupt rise in population of India since 1921?
Or
Give reasons for the steep rise in India's population since 1921.

Question 20. While studying population growth, what are the two main aspects or characteristics to be kept in mind? Distinguish between the two.

Question 21. Write a short note on: Urbanisation in India.
Or
What is the impact of fast -growing cities of India on the environment and available civic amenities?
Or
Write a brief account on the impact of rapid urbanisation in India.
Or
Why has the rapid growth of population in the metropolitan cities of India become a serious problem? Explain any five consequences of the same.

Long Answer-Type Questions

Question 22. Why is it important to study population?
Or
What is the purpose of studying population?

Question 23. What could be the reason of uneven distribution of population in India?
Or
What are the factors which influence the population distribution?

 (Continued ... Link for answers of Question No 15 - 23 given below) 

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CBSE News: CBSE may introduce two mathematics papers under Class 10

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Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) an autonomous organization under the Union Ministry of Human Resource Development; Govt. of India, is considering to introduce two mathematics papers in the Class 10 board examinations from the academic year 2019-20.
The premier national board's governing body on Monday discussed the proposal. Under the plan, there may be a "basic paper" for everyone and a "standard paper" for those keen to join the science stream in Classes 9 and 12, two governing body members said.
"Only those who clear the `standard paper' will be able to study mathematics in Class 11. So, would-be science students will have to clear the `standard paper'," one of the members said.
The other member said: "The governing body will meet again in June when a final decision may be taken." Currently, the board curriculum provides for a single paper in mathematics.
There's no plan to have two papers in any other subject, the two governing body members said.
About 15 lakh children from nearly 20,000 CBSE-affiliated schools took the Class 10 board exam in 2018.
Last year, the National Council of Educational Research and Training conducted a National Achievement Survey to assess the learning levels of pupils of Classes 3, 5 and 8 in mathematics, environment studies and language. The survey showed the children feared mathematics the most.
Courtesy: www.cbse.nic.in
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NCERT not in favour to reduce syllabus by 50 per cent | CBSE Guide NCERT Solutions

NCERT (National Council of Educational Research and Training) is expected to reduce the school social science syllabuses by up to 20 per cent but keep any cuts to the minimum in mathematics, the sciences and language subjects.

NCERT said that it is no way involved in revising the school textbooks following a government nudge early this year, would follow the Centre's recommendation to reduce the syllabuses by 50 per cent across the board.

While the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) follows the NCERT textbooks, 23 state school boards have adapted these, with minimal changes to some of the books. The revised books will be prescribed from the coming academic session.

Human resource development minister Prakash Javadekar had at an event on Wednesday said: "In order to provide enough time to students to develop their talents, the syllabus is proposed to be reduced by half." But NCERT officials said they had decided to limit the syllabus cuts on the basis of the more than one lakh comments they had received after seeking feedback from the stakeholders.

Like the government, the parents mostly wanted the syllabus and the NCERT textbooks reduced by around half, but the teachers largely supported the present content load. Some teachers even demanded additional content, council sources said.

"We have to ensure that Indian students do not lag behind in rigor. They should be able to compete at the international level," an official involved in the revision said. He added that the council also needed to ensure that the increase in content from one class to the next resembled a smooth progression rather than a sharp jump, which might happen if the curriculum was drastically reduced in the lower classes.

Council officials therefore found the target of a 50 per cent reduction of syllabus impractical, he said. They felt that physics and chemistry, particularly in Classes 9 to 10, allowed hardly any scope to reduce the syllabus while in mathematics, the extra examples and illustrations could be done away with.

History, political science and economics did lend themselves to somewhat higher cuts, the officials decided. The council has already prepared "expected learning outcome" norms for every class, and felt the syllabus revision must adhere to these.

"The NCERT will not go by the wishes of the parents. As a top academic body, its focus is on the students learning (their subjects)," the official said. The ministry had asked NCERT to reduce the syllabus on the basis of feedback it had received at six conferences, attended mostly by education officials from the states, it had held last year.

"Students are bogged down so much in studies right from the eighth standard onwards that they have no time to spare for manifesting and nurturing their talents," Javadekar had said on Wednesday.

NCERT had last revised all syllabuses in 2005 and its textbooks in 2006-07. According to the best international practices, school syllabuses and textbooks should be revised every five years.

Just before the NDA government came to power in May 2014, NCERT had started the process of reviewing its curricula and books by setting up 21 focus groups. But the new government asked it to put off the revision on the ground that the process for drafting a new education policy had started. The policy has not been finalized yet..
(Source: The Telegraph, edited)

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CBSE NCERT Solutions of Class 9 Geography Chapter 6, Population | CBSE Guide NCERT Answers

Class 9, NCERT Geography - Contemporary India I

Chapter 6, POPULATION

NCERT Solutions, NCERT Answers of geography textbook exercise questions

Question 1: Choose the right answer from the four alternatives:
(i) Migrations change the number, distribution and composition of the population in -
(a) The area of departure
(b) The area of arrival
(c) Both the areas of departure and arrival
(d) None of the above
(ii) A large proportion of children in a population is a result of -
(a) high birth rates
(b) high life expectancies
(c) high death rates
(d) more married couples
(iii) The magnitude of population growth refers to -
(a) The total population of an area
(b) The number of persons added each year
(c) The rate at which the population increases
(d) The number of females power thousand males
(iv) According to the census 2001, a "literate" person is one who -
(a) can read and write his/her name
(b) can read and write any language
(c) is 7 years old and can read and write any language with understanding
(d) knows the 3 'R's (reading, writing, arithmetic)
Answer : (i) - c. (ii) - a. (iii) - b. (iv) - c.
Question 2: Answer the following questions briefly.
(i) Why is the rate of population growth in India declining since 1981?
(ii) Discuss the major components of population growth.
(iii) Define age structure, death rate and birth rate.
(iv) How is migration a detrimental factor of population change?
Answer (i): There are quite a few reasons because of which the rate of population growth in India has been declining since 1981. Some of the reasons are as follows:
(a) Family planning programmes, initiated by the government have been spreading awareness among the people about the benefits of delayed marriages for girls and also small family norm.
(b) Educational programmes have improved the literacy rate. This has helped more and more people to understand the benefits of a small family. Also population control measures taken by the Govt and several NGOs have been quite effective.
As a result of the above, birth rates declined rapidly since 1981 which caused a decline in the rate of population growth.
Answer (ii): The three major components of population growth are the following -
(a) Birth Rate
The greater the birth of children, the higher will be population growth. On the other hand, the lesser the birth of children, the lower will be population growth.
(b) Death Rate
The higher death rate will reduce the population growth but the lower death rate will add to the population growth.
(c) Migration
Migration is the movement of the people from one country to the other country. If this process of migration is within the country, it does not bring any change in the size of population. But migration to other countries does affect the size of population.
Answer (iii):
Age Structure
The age structure of a population refers to the number of people in the different age groups in a particular country. The population of a country is composed of children of 0-14 years, adults of 15-59 years, senior citizens aged 60 years and above. The children and senior citizens are not producers or earners as such they depend on the adults for their maintenance and hence they add to the dependency ratio.
Birth Rate and Death Rate
Birth Rate is the number of live births per thousand persons in a year whereas Death Rate means the deaths per thousand persons in a year. The difference between birth and death rate gives us the growth rate of population of any country in a year.
The widening gap between the birth and death rates is one of the main reasons for higher growth rate in India.
Answer (iv): Migration is a detrimental factor of population change, because -
(a) During migration people move from one region to another region. The change in population because of this movement can be internal as well as international.
(b) International migration changes the size of the population whereas internal migration does not change the size of the population but influences the distribution of the population within the nation.
(c) Migration also changes the composition of urban and rural population in terms of the age and sex ratios. In India the rural-urban migration has resulted in a steady increase in the percentage of population in cities and towns.
Thus, migration is a detrimental factor of population change as it affects the demographics of both the areas of departure and arrival.

Question 3: Distinguish between population growth and population change.    
Answer: Population is a dynamic phenomenon. Population Growth and Population Change can be distinguished as follows:
Population Growth
Growth of population refers to the increase in the number of inhabitants of a country or region during a specific period of time. Population growth can be expressed in two ways: (1) in terms of absolute numbers, (2) in terms of percentage.
The absolute number is the magnitude of increase which is obtained by simply subtracting the earlier population from the later population. In terms of percentage we express the rate of increase of population per annum which is also known as ‘annual growth rate’.
Natural increase and immigration are the major causes for population growth.
Population Change
Change in population refers to the change in distribution, composition or size of a population during a specific period of time. Some major causes of population change are - natural increase and migration (immigration, emigration). 


Cbse Ncert Solution of Class IX Geography Chapter 6, Population
Question 4: What is the relation between occupational structure and development?
Answer: The distribution of population according to the different types of occupation is referred to as ‘Occupational Structure’. Occupational Structure has a great impact on development. Occupations are generally divided into four categories - primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary. Primary occupations include - agriculture, animal husbandry, fishing and forestry. Secondary occupations include - primarily manufacturing industries. Tertiary occupations include services like - doctors, teachers, etc. while quaternary occupations include the more intellectual occupations.
The proportion of people engaged in different activities reflects the economic development of a country. Developed nations have a high proportion of people in secondary and tertiary activities. Developing nations such as India, Sri Lanka etc. tend to have higher proportion of their workforce engaged in primary activities.      
Question 5: What are the advantages of having a healthy population?
Answer: There are several advantages of having a healthy population -
(i) Health is an important factor of population composition which boosts the development. A healthy person is much more efficient and productive and therefore, a healthy population is an asset for the nation.
(ii) Absenteeism is low and capability is high where workers are healthy.
(iii) Economic development of a country depends on the quality, ability and efficiency of its people. So, healthy population is the most important criterion for the prosperity and development of any country.          
 Friends, this chapter is an important chapter. There are Many More Important Questions which can be asked in exam from this chapter. So, don't miss those additional CBSE questions which we have found out and tried to answer in our site. To view these questions please click on the link given below ...



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