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Power Sharing Class X Political Science | Answers of NCERT (CBSE) Democratic Politics II Textbook In-text and Sample Questions


CBSE Class 10, Democratic Politics - II (Political Science)
POWER SHARING - Solutions of Intext and Extra (Sample) Questions
Solution Q1: In democracy, it is the established principle that the government is run by the majority. But, majority does not mean only the majority in numbers based on religion or community. In its true sense, majority means majority of opinion. Sometimes, majority community may also have part in majority opinion. So, rule by majority community is not a taboo in democracy, if it is based on opinion.
Of course, Sinhalas form the majority community of Srilanka and it should have bigger share in the government. But, it does not mean that others do not get proper representation. If it is so, it will not be a true democracy.  
Solution Q2: The parents of Annette are more likely to succeed. Because, in Belgium, the community government is elected by the people, belonging to one language community----Dutch, French or German speaking. This government has the power regarding cultural, educational and language related issues. On the other hand, in Srilanka, education is taken care of, by the central government. And for common people, it is almost impossible to consult the central government and make it solve such a problem.
Solution Q3: No, the changing of class monitor every month cannot be called a power sharing arrangement. Because, in power sharing arrangement, there are different institutions and interest groups which exercise their power and check the actions of each other. This arrangement is also called a system of checks and balances.
Solution Q4 a: This is an example of power sharing among different organs of the government. Here, the power is shared between the Judiciary and the Executive.
Solution Q4 b: This is an example of power sharing among different social groups. Here, the power is shared between the aboriginals and other social groups.
Solution Q4 c: This is an example of power sharing arrangements in the way political parties, pressure groups and movements control or influence power. Here, the power is shared between SPS and the liberal Yabloko movement.
Solution Q4 d: This is an example of power sharing among governments at different levels.    Here, the power is shared between federal and state governments and also among the state governments.
Solution Q5: (1) There had been a conflict between the Dutch and the French speaking people in Belgium during 1950s and 1960s.
(2) In Belgium the minority French speaking community was relatively rich and powerful. This was resented by the Dutch speaking community, who got the benefit of economic development and education much later. This led to a conflict between them during 1950s and 1960s.
Solution Q6: (1) The newly elected government followed preferential policies that favoured Sinhala applicants for university positions and government jobs.
(2) The government, under constitutional obligation, was to protect and foster Buddhism.
(3)  The government passed an Act in 1956 to recognize Sinhala as the only official language. 

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